Brother Outsider from Kingsley Uwalaka on Vimeo.

For years, That Uppity Theatre Company has continued to explore issues of racial justice and economic equality through such projects as our original play, “One Sunday Morning” about racial profiling and After Rodney, a poetry performance group of white women and women of color. Now we are partnering  with a loss consortium of actives around the country that are committed to advance the legacy of the late great Bayard Rustin,  a pivotal and lesser known figure in the civil rights movement. During his 60-year career, Rustin formulated many of the strategies that propelled the American civil liberties movement, including the historic March on Washington in 1963.  But his open homosexuality forced him to remain in the background, marking him as a "brother outsider."

On June 24, we will partner with the Missouri History Museum on an exciting program about the late great civil rights activist Bayard Rustin, the principal architect of the historic 1963 March on Washington.

We are offering different organizations the opportunity to have a free information table at our 6 pm reception. Some of the organizations that will have tables include: NCCJ-STL, Growing American Youth, Charis, Promo , St. Louis Gender Foundation , ADL , Organization for Black Struggle, KDHX, SAGE, Stonewall Democrats, St. John UCC, Liberation Christian Church, Diversity Awareness Partnership,  A Call to Conscience, Urban League Young Professionals, Women’s Voices Raised for Social Justice, KWMU, Ethical Society of Saint Louis, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, That Uppity Theatre Company, Diversity Awareness Partnership. There are several other groups we are hoping will have tables as well.

This event will be held at the Missouri History Museum at 5700 Lindell Blvd. in Forest Park on Monday, June 24th. The evening will begin at 6 PM with a reception with informational tables from various community organizations, and the film Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin will be screened at 7 PM in Lee Auditorium.

Rustin is a pivotal figure in the civil rights movement, but most people do not know about him. "During his 60-year career, Bayard Rustin formulated many of the strategies that propelled the American civil liberties movement, including the March on Washington in 1963.  But his open homosexuality forced him to remain in the background, marking him as a "brother outsider." 

A Q&A with Walter Naegle, Rustin's partner who is based in NYC and is executor of the Bayard Rustin estate, and St. Louis-area activist and writer/director Joan Lipkin follows the screening.  The evening will conclude with a special short tribute performance of OUT FROM THE SHADOWS, A Tribute to Bayard Taylor Rustin by A Call to Conscience featuring Jerome Davis, Peggy Calvin, Dennis Lebby, Mark Albrecht, and directed by Fannie Lebby.

Media Information:

Facebook Event Page

Vital Voice Article about Event

Stonewall Democrats Newsletter Article

History Museum blurb about the event

Remembering Bayard Rustin, An Unsung Civil Rights Activist
Cityscape, KWMU

Theatre troupe brings overlooked activist 'Out of the Shadows'
St. Louis American

Bayard Rustin's Day in the Sun
Furvor Magazine

... that Bayard Rustin was a master strategist and tireless activist who is best remembered as the organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, one of the largest nonviolent protests in the US. 

... that his bio is especially of interest to LGBT Americans, highlighting the contributions of an out gay man to end official segregation in America? 

... that in 1944, Rustin, a Quaker and a conscientious objector refused to register for the draft and served 26 months in jail?

... that Rustin's activism began as early as high school when he was arrested for sitting at a segregated lunch counter in his home town of West Chester, Pennsylvania. 

... that in 1944, Rustin, a Quaker and a conscientious objector refused to register for the draft and served 26 months in jail?

... that in 1947, Rustin participated in the Journey of Reconciliation--a two week pilgrimage thru Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky--in which 16 activists (8 black, and 8 white) use nonviolent direct methods to employ direct action methods to test the 1946 Supreme Court decision that ruled that segregation is unconstitutional on interstate buses.  They faced angry mobs.

That Uppity Theatre Company • 4466 West Pine Boulevard, Suite 13C • Saint Louis, MO 63108
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